Wellness

Hard Knocks rugby star on Well-being

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By Lance Shearman

Joe Harawira MBA, stars alongside Sir John Kirwan in Duke TV’s “School of Hard Knocks”. He’s also the RugbySmart Manager (NZRU), founder of Flo clothing, and client of Velocity Financial. I caught up with him to talk well-being.

Believe it or not, Joe and I played rugby together. We were both wingers, putting to rest the age old question, what would have happened if 80s All Black sensation Terry Wright came up against 90s bulldozer Jonah Lomu? (Note: I was the Terry Wright equivalent. Ask me some time about the result!)

Joe is a fit guy, highly motivated, and he tells me he has “flex-appeal” (he may or may not have used this term). If anyone could bring some thinking around well-being, he would be the person! So I picked his brain.

Well-being for Joe means having the right conditions to flourish in all aspects of life: physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual. Consistency in these areas is fundamental to long term health and well-being.

I asked him about well-being in the work place. He said that well-being has come a long way, but more needs to be done. For instance, it’s great to see workplaces embracing the notion of a “well-being week” or the like. However, outside of these initiatives staff are working longer hours and the digital age means many of us take work home or do it in the weekends.

Recent surveys show that stress related illnesses and heart attacks are at an all-time high, particularly among males over the age of 40. This is an issue that must be addressed, says Joe.

Joe has been very successful in his studies and his career, so what would motivate him to start a social enterprise targeting lifestyle fashion? His response in short: “To create a brand that stands for more than just fashion.”

Flo (short for flourish) Clothing brings together his love of health and fitness and lifestyle fashion and his passion for giving back. Joe’s vision is to helps kids around the world: “Flo is a community where we don’t just aspire towards our own hopes and dreams, but we want to help others and we want to give back because that’s when we create real value.”

In New Zealand, one in four kids go without the basics that many of us take for granted, and that’s where Flo comes in. Flo is the New Zealand lifestyle brand with a mission to “level the playing field” so all kids flourish in school and in life.

Every purchase provides a meal in school for a child in need. It also helps sponsor kids to access sport and recreational activities outside of school. Joe says, “This is made possible through a partnership model with amazing charities and initiatives.”

Joe is about to start a crowd funding campaign through Pledge Me to expand into the yoga market and deliver more impact for kids in need.

Joe is passionate about making a difference and actively promoting well-being at a personal and professional level.

If you’re at Wellington airport over September be sure to call into the Flo pop up store to see Joe and the team. Otherwise check him out below:

Instagram @flo_clothing

Website www.flo.kiwi

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Lance Shearman is a Registered Financial Adviser with Velocity Financial. No investment decision should be taken based on the information in this blog alone. A disclosure statement is available free of charge upon request.

5 Quick Financial Wins

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By Simon O’Neill

1: Do an honest expense report for yourself. Where are you spending too much? Seeing it on paper can be a trigger to change a habit.

2: Automate your savings. This is a trick many financially savvy people know about. Before you spend a single cent, put away at least 10 per cent of your income into a savings account. Name it something cool like “Dream Home” or “Bucket List Concert” to remind you why you are stashing cash away each month.

3: Limit the entertainment overdose. Eating and drinking out are the reason this old catch phrase was coined: “To have too much month left at the end of the money.” Only commit to things you can afford and don’t say yes to things just because you are invited.

4: The “no spending” day. Pick a day. Don’t spend a thing. Repeat each week.

5: Remember, less is more. Do you need all those subscriptions? Netflix, Lightbox, Spotify, YouTube? What can you cull? Need that gym membership if you only go once a week … or once a month?

And one bonus…

6: Give!

Paradoxically, being generous makes us feel abundant and, like having a savings strategy, forces us to adopt a more disciplined approach to money. Plus, the universe rewards us by giving us more!

If you are drawing a line in the sand today and saying, “Right, I need to make a change”, that is great! It’s a huge first step.

We can help you take the next step by helping you analyse what’s going on and where positive changes can take place. For more info talk to us in the office, online or over the phones.

Simon O’Neill is a Registered Financial Adviser with Velocity Financial. No investment decision should be taken based on the information in this blog alone. A disclosure statement is available free of charge upon request.

5 Tips to Mastering your Money

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By Graham Goodisson

Many Kiwis have the means to gain financial well-being, but just need a strategy to get there. We share our top five tips for putting together a successful money strategy.

I’ve never wanted to be rich, just comfortable enough that when the bills come in, they get paid without needing to look around the room to see what could be put on TradeMe.

So, what does financial security mean to you? Take a moment and write down what it means to you. Perhaps completing the sentence below could help?

I will know I am financially secure when _________________.

What would your life look like or feel like if you were winning financially? How will you know when you reach your definition of financial security?

This table demonstrates how financial well-being can be understood as both about the present and the future and is at the same time about feeling secure and free.

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Many Kiwis believe they’re just not cut out to enjoy this sort of financial well-being; that being in control of their finances and having financial freedom is simply out of reach. Instead, they get paid, they pay the bills (or those that they can) and spend the rest (if there is any left).

For many people, surplus is just not a word in their vocabulary.

How good would it feel to have money leftover to allocate to a holiday fund, a savings account, top up the bills account, put some money down for the kids’ Christmas presents? It feels pretty good, let me tell you.

For me, it certainly wasn’t always that way, but I wanted, needed even, to make a change as it was doing my head in to be “skint”. And I don’t like canned spaghetti that much!

Google “financial well-being” and you’ll never be short of things to read. Often, the search results will use lingo and some techniques that can sound like a foreign language. Many people start with these Googled tips and then give up or don’t try to get things sorted because it’s too hard or they don’t want to look silly.

I want to let you in on a secret: You can experience financial well-being regardless of your income.

Sitting down with a financial adviser and talking about your situation can be hugely empowering, because there is always something we can do to get things heading in the right direction. We’ll break down your personal situation and identify the things you’re doing right (well done you!) and where there’s room for improvement.

So, turning into the wind and facing this head on, what we don’t want to do is bombard you with technical lingo only to have you think, “Nope. Too hard!” Instead, what follows are my top five easy-to-initiate tips to get you on the road to financial freedom and five quick wins that you can implement today.

Graham Goodisson is a Registered Financial Adviser with Velocity Financial. No investment decision should be taken based on the information in this blog alone. A disclosure statement is available free of charge upon request.