Home Styling

Am I Ready to Buy for the First Time? Or Again?

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There is one constant in the ever-changing world of banking: the confusion as to what people can and can’t afford. Lance explores the murky waters of why some banks say yes and some say no.

 

Yeah? Nah.

 

I often find myself sitting with people who believed they were in no position to purchase but could and, conversely, people who believed they could but, at that time, could not. Beyond this, they may have been sabotaging their plans by putting together a strategy that was actually taking them even further away from their house-buying goal.

 

To help clear up some of the confusion, there are really only three things a bank is interested in:

1. Deposit (or equity)

2. Income

3. Debt

 

A scenario I have come across often is when people have strong income, some debt, but a low deposit. They believe their biggest hurdle is the debt, so set about reducing this. The truth is, while they have some debt, their earnings are at a level that the debt is easily managed, even with a mortgage. They need to increase their deposit, but unfortunately all their extra cash is being channelled inefficiently towards debt repayment and, so, unnecessarily delaying their timeframe for purchase.

 

To all those colour-coded Excel spread sheet lovers …

 

There can be times when people have been up all hours looking at properties or going to open homes for months when, unfortunately, they had no ability to purchase at their target price point. This can be frustrating as numbers can be based on correct “true-to-life” calculations. However, banks have their own rules of basic math.

 

When a bank calculates what we can afford to borrow, they use a far higher interest rate (to mitigate fluctuations), and they have a minimum average spend for cost of living for each scenario presented e.g. two adults, one child vs. one adult, no children etc. Furthermore, because each bank perceives risks in different ways, they each calculate a household’s scenario differently. They’ll give greater or less importance to things like the number of vehicles you own and whether child support is organised formally through the IRD, as well as a few other quirks.

 

“If I could turn back time.” — Cher

Time is our gift to you. Tell us your scenario, what you are hoping to do, and when you are hoping to do it. Let us sit down and come up with a clear strategy based on what you are truly able to do.

 

If it is not today, let us help you journey towards that “yes” sooner rather than later. Let’s unpack your plans beyond this next purchase and consider the ramifications of each step. Let’s reduce the uncertainty.

 

Lance Shearman is a Registered Financial Adviser with Velocity Financial. No investment decision should be taken based on the information in this blog alone. A disclosure statement is available free of charge upon request.

Hope for First-Home Buyers?

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By Stevie Waring

As the newest member of Velocity Financial (I started with the company in April), I

quickly realised that I was the only person in the office who isn’t a homeowner. I

soon became determined to change that.

My partner and I had talked about home ownership a lot over the past year but

viewed it as something that could only occur in the future—maybe one or two

years away at the earliest.

We watched as the news reported rapid increases in house prices in New

Zealand and Wellington. We were faced with an epidemic. Who were we but

mere mortals? We couldn’t fight an epidemic. So we made peace with the ever

lengthening time between now and home ownership.

Coincidently, I had organised to come along to Lance’s Home Buyers Club that he

runs fortnightly at the office to see what it involved and, just mere days before

this, my partner and I found out that we were getting kicked out of our rental

property and we needed to move again this year.

At the Home Buyers Club it quickly became clear that things weren’t as grim as

we had once thought. There were still houses on the market, in our price range,

and the overdraft we ran into during our first years of university wouldn’t put us

on the bank’s black list after all. What a revelation!

What was to follow in the next four months was like your first relationship: an

emotional rollercoaster filled with checking your emails and TradeMe

obsessively—hoping that cute little three bedroom with insulation likes you as

much as you like it.

I hope our story can bring hope to those with seemingly far off home ownership

dreams. As time continues to go by and your friends and family are telling you

that the next one will be the one, it can be really easy to put pressure on yourself.

However, here are three tips that helped us stay sane and optimistic along the

way:

1. Take a Break

You will not miss out on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because you spent one

restful Sunday eating brunch and lying in the sun, I promise.

2. Don’t Shop for a Bargain

They don’t really exist. And hunting for these unicorns just takes up your energy

and time.

3. Make it a Team Sport

Build an amazing team of professionals around you who will reduce your stress

and encourage you to persevere during this process.

How do tiny houses stack up?

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By Stevie Waring

 

Is the tiny house the answer for the struggling first-home buyer? Definitely “yes” for some; definitely “no” for others.

 

In recent years, it has become more and more difficult to be a first-home buyer in New Zealand and renting has become more expensive in many parts of the country.

 

Naturally, many people have come up with alternative solutions. Some students have chosen the “go big” alternative where you live with 10 or more people in the hope of splitting costs. Or you may want a waterfront property without the price tag? Enter the houseboat life. Or you may be a young person, family or couple that wants a home but have no idea how to fund it.

 

This is exactly where the tiny home revolution has taken off. The idea being that you can live a minimalist lifestyle in a carefully designed bespoke small space that is both efficient in space and cost.

 

Apart from the creativity and innovation of it, the biggest bonus of a tiny house is the price. You essentially pay for a standard base plan, and then you pay per room after that. It is totally customisable. It allows you to be creative and unique with your space while giving you the financial freedom to spend your money on higher quality items that may have been unavailable to you with a regular home, such as full insulation, solar panels or beautiful hardwood floors, for example.

 

So how do you pay for it?

 

In Wellington, the average house price is $639,112 (as of June 2018, QV.co.nz) but basic tiny houses are less than $100,000. That’s a no-brainer, right?

 

The short answer is that you can do it, but a bank won’t necessarily give you a mortgage for it.

 

If you see a tiny home in your future, here are a few things to consider:

·         Where will you put it?

o   If you’re planning to buy land, you may be able to use your KiwiSaver.

o   If you have friends or family with some land, it’s probably easiest to put it there.

·         Do you or family have an existing mortgage?

o   If you or your family have existing equity in your property, you may be able to refinance it to access that cash to put towards your new tiny home.

 

Long story short: If you are looking to lead a simpler, more efficient lifestyle that is cheaper in the long-term, then this may well be the solution for you.

 

If you are looking for an alternative to buying a first home because you may not have the funds for a deposit yet, this may not be the solution for you.

 

As with everyone situation, there is often more than one answer, so give us a ring and we can talk through your options—big or small.

Home & Fashion Styling: Why Kmart is the answer

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Summer is here. It’s time to make those touch ups around your home and to also confirm your summer gear still fits and, more importantly, is still on trend! So, here is Lance’s summer style guide.

 

1. You can dress your house at Kmart!

I’m not sure if you have been paying attention lately but Kmart has now become the go-to store for on-trend décor and value-for-money style … no jokes! Plus, they are open late and, if you select the right pieces, you will have your guests jealous about your “high end” accessories.

 

2. Front doors, rollerblades and bum bags

We all know the importance of first impressions. Your home entrance should look great, so take the opportunity to freshen up the front door of your home—either spruce up the existing paint job or go crazy with a bright feature door to show off your personality.

 

The same goes for your personal fashion choices. Make a bold entrance to summer with something daring that expresses your uniqueness. Perhaps it’s a return to the 80s with a belt bag and some roller blades? And, although black is classic, be sure to have something fluoro in your arsenal so you stand out from the crowd.

 

3. Storage and Clutter

Jerry Seinfeld shares some wise words on decluttering your home:
“There are too many things! … All things on earth only exist in different stages of becoming garbage. Your home is a garbage processing centre, where you buy new things, bring them into your house and slowly craperfy them over time.” – Watch Jerry’s full skit here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfYzlSNHapA

 

So, if you’re guilty of running a home garbage processing centre, save yourself from the inevitable and take older or less loved items to a charity store or sell them on TradeMe. Do it now and enjoy a clutter free summer!

 

And what about fashion? Well, go to your wardrobe, if there are items you didn’t wear last summer, put them in a bag and take them to your local Salvation Army Family Store. Those items are just taking up space and now you can put new stuff in there you will actually wear!

 

Lance Shearman is a Registered Financial Adviser with Velocity Financial. No investment decision should be taken based on the information in this blog alone. A disclosure statement is available free of charge upon request.